How Many Blocks Do I Need For My Wall

Calculating the number of blocks you need for a wall is easy if you know the right formula.   There are several types of walls to consider and each require somewhat different calculations.

You can utilize the calculations below or try our 3D Virtual Builder to model your wall, change colors, and determine the number of blocks you need.

Of course, we are here to assist in helping you figure out the number of blocks you might need. You can always email us at: sales@everblocksystems.com 


See instructions below, or use our automated 3D wall calculator by clicking here:  VIRTUAL WALL BUILDER


Straight Wall Section (With Straight ENDS)

This is the formula to determine the number of Full and Half Blocks required to create a standard wall, in a brick lay pattern, which straight ends:

(Length in Ft * Height in Ft * 2) -  Height in Ft = Number of Full Blocks 

Height in Ft * 2 =  Number of half Blocks


Example:    20ft wall x 5ft high = (20 * 5 * 2) - 5 = 195 Full Blocks

  5ft hight * 2 = 10 Half Blocks

  So a 20ft wall that is 5ft high would require 195 Full Blocks and 10 Half Blocks

Note: Walls in excess of 5ft tall are not recommended without additional support (either T's at ends (see below), a turn of the wall, or by being fastened to a fixed wall or ceiling with elbow brackets)


Wall With An "L"or "T" on One Side for additional stability

Adding a short or long "L" or "T" to the end of a wall adds tremendous stability and is recommended for longer or taller spans.  This technique is generally used when you don't want to affix the blocks to permanent walls or ceilings or the wall is free-standing. 


Short "L" projecting front OR back (12" total width of "L") of one end of the wall

Creating a short T simply involves turning a block sideways at the end so it is perpendicular to the wall. Choose which direction to turn the block (facing front of wall or back of wall) and then alternate each row so that one row has a block turned and the next has it straight. Add a half block over the turned full block every other row. 

The calculation for such a wall is as follows:

(Length in Ft * Height in Ft * 2)  = Number of Full Blocks 

Height in Ft *2 =  Number of half Blocks

Example:    20ft wall x 5ft high = (20 * 5 * 2) = 200 Full Blocks

  5ft hight * 2 = 10 Half Blocks

  So a 20ft wall that is 5ft high with a 12 inch "T" at one end would require 200 Full Blocks and 10 Half Blocks

 

"T" projecting on both sides (18" total width) of one end of the wall

Creating a longer T involves rotating a full block and combining with a half block to create an 18" long "T". This type of T offers stability on both sides of the 6" wall and is recommended for higher walls. 

One the first row, rotate the last full block sideways. Add another Half Block on the opposite site of the direction that the full block is projecting.  This results in a full block from the wall at a 90 degree angle to the rotated full block and half block. 

On the second row, stagger the wall blocks as you would with a standard wall, but do not rotate the last block.  Add two half blocks on either side of the non-rotated full block, placing one half block on the rotated block from the first row and one on the half block from from the first row. 

On the third row, stagger again and rotate the last block 90 degrees, in the opposite direction of the first block. Add a half block over the prior rows half block. 

Continue repeating this patten until the wall is complete. 

 

The calculation for such a wall is as follows:

(Length in Ft * Height in Ft * 2)  = Number of Full Blocks 

Height in Ft * 4 =  Number of half Blocks

Example:    20ft wall x 5ft high = (20 * 5 * 2) = 200 Full Blocks

  5ft hight * 4 = 20 Half Blocks

  So a 20ft wall that is 5ft high with an 18 inch "T", projecting on both sides of one end would require 200

 Full Blocks and 20 Half Blocks

 

Wall WitH "L"'s or "T"'s on Both Ends of the Wall for additional stability

 

Short "L" on both ends of the wall (12" total width)

These are similar to the above, except an "L" is added to both ends of the wall for additional support.   

The calculation for such a wall is as follows:

(Length in Ft * Height in Ft * 2) + Height in Ft = Number of Full Blocks 

Height in Ft *2 =  Number of half Blocks

Example:    20ft wall x 5ft high = (20 * 5 * 2) + 5 = 205 Full Blocks

  5ft hight * 2 = 10 Half Blocks

  So a 20ft wall that is 5ft high with a 2- 12 inch "T"s  (one at either end) would require 205 Full Blocks and 10     Half Blocks

 

Long "T" on both ends of the wall (18" total width)

The calculation for such a wall is as follows:

(Length in Ft * Height in Ft * 2)  = Number of Full Blocks 

Height in Ft * 4 =  Number of half Blocks

Example:    20ft wall x 5ft high = (20 * 5 * 2) = 200 Full Blocks

  5ft hight * 4 = 20 Half Blocks

  So a 20ft wall that is 5ft high with an 18 inch "T", projecting on both sides of one end would require 200

 Full Blocks and 20 Half Blocks

 

STRAIGHT (longer) Wall With Multiple Support Column's Over Length of Wall

You can also stabilize a wall by adding simple support columns within the wall, thus widening the footprint of the wall at multiple locations along the length. 

This can be done in two ways:

Column Method 1

Note columns on backside of wall, using column method two. 

Note columns on backside of wall, using column method two. 

The first way, rotating and centering a full block every several feet is simplest and provides a width of 12" at the places where a column is placed.   This method employs a series of quarter blocks on either side of the wall, to finishing to column. Quarter blocks are placed between rotated full blocks.  The wall stagger pattern is a single lug slot (versus the traditional 2 lug/half block spacing) which means that quarter blocks are required at either end of the wall, to finish the wall. 

This method is generally used when you don't mind seeing a column on both sides of the wall and provides the best stability over a long span.  

Column Method 2

The second way is to rotate a full block sideways, similar to the "L" but at various places along the wall. This requires a bit more thought as a combination of full and half blocks are required both along the protruding column, between rotated blocks, AND adjacent to rotated blocks within the main wall itself.  This method is generally used when you want to support a wall but do not want to see columns on both sides.